Days

0

Speakers

0

Possibilities

0

Invited speakers

Prof. Dr. Nicole Dubilier Director at MPI for Marine Microbiology (Bremen)

The De­part­ment of Sym­bi­osis stud­ies the bio­logy and eco­logy of as­so­ci­ations between bac­teria and eu­k­a­ryotes, with our main em­phasis on mar­ine in­ver­teb­rates from chemo­syn­thetic en­vir­on­ments such as sulf­ide-rich coastal sed­i­ments, vents and seeps.
Our re­search on sym­bi­oses between mi­crobes and an­im­als is centered around three ques­tions:
Who are the symbiotic partners?
This ques­tion is easy to an­swer for the an­imal side of the sym­bi­osis, but it re­mains a chal­lenge to re­veal the true di­versity of mi­croor­gan­isms, even in such low-di­versity hab­it­ats as sym­bi­oses.
What are they doing?
What is the meta­bol­ism of the sym­bionts? Which path­ways do the sym­bionts use to gain en­ergy and feed their host? How do the sym­bionts se­quester car­bon, ni­tro­gen, and sul­fur from the en­vir­on­ment?
How has the symbiosis evolved?
How have biogeo­graphy, en­vir­on­mental con­di­tions, and phylo­gen­etic re­la­tion­ships in­flu­enced the evol­u­tion of the sym­bi­osis? How have the part­ners ad­ap­ted to the sym­bi­osis?

Prof. Dr. Nicole Dubilier Director at MPI for Marine Microbiology (Bremen)

The De­part­ment of Sym­bi­osis stud­ies the bio­logy and eco­logy of as­so­ci­ations between bac­teria and eu­k­a­ryotes, with our main em­phasis on mar­ine in­ver­teb­rates from chemo­syn­thetic en­vir­on­ments such as sulf­ide-rich coastal sed­i­ments, vents and seeps.
Our re­search on sym­bi­oses between mi­crobes and an­im­als is centered around three ques­tions:
Who are the symbiotic partners?
This ques­tion is easy to an­swer for the an­imal side of the sym­bi­osis, but it re­mains a chal­lenge to re­veal the true di­versity of mi­croor­gan­isms, even in such low-di­versity hab­it­ats as sym­bi­oses.
What are they doing?
What is the meta­bol­ism of the sym­bionts? Which path­ways do the sym­bionts use to gain en­ergy and feed their host? How do the sym­bionts se­quester car­bon, ni­tro­gen, and sul­fur from the en­vir­on­ment?
How has the symbiosis evolved?
How have biogeo­graphy, en­vir­on­mental con­di­tions, and phylo­gen­etic re­la­tion­ships in­flu­enced the evol­u­tion of the sym­bi­osis? How have the part­ners ad­ap­ted to the sym­bi­osis?

closepopup
Prof. Dr. Tobias ErbDirector at MPI for Terrestrial Microbiology (Marburg)

We focus on the discovery, understanding and engineering of novel enzymes and pathways, especially those that capture and convert the carbon dioxide. In a so-called retrosynthetic approach, we are looking for synthetic alternatives that work more efficiently than naturally evolved ones - for example, a synthetic photosynthesis that binds CO2 more efficiently and thus could reduce the excess of the greenhouse gas.
To this end, we are conducting research at the interface between microbial physiology, biochemistry and synthetic biology. Our biologic-synthetic approach enable us to understand the basic principles of the construction of metabolic networks. In the future, this will allow us to realize new biological structures and processes, for example artificial photosynthesis, or synthetic organelles and cells.

Prof. Dr. Tobias ErbDirector at MPI for Terrestrial Microbiology (Marburg)

We focus on the discovery, understanding and engineering of novel enzymes and pathways, especially those that capture and convert the carbon dioxide. In a so-called retrosynthetic approach, we are looking for synthetic alternatives that work more efficiently than naturally evolved ones - for example, a synthetic photosynthesis that binds CO2 more efficiently and thus could reduce the excess of the greenhouse gas.
To this end, we are conducting research at the interface between microbial physiology, biochemistry and synthetic biology. Our biologic-synthetic approach enable us to understand the basic principles of the construction of metabolic networks. In the future, this will allow us to realize new biological structures and processes, for example artificial photosynthesis, or synthetic organelles and cells.

closepopup
Dr. Tristan WagnerGroup leader of the Microbial Metabolism Research Group

The Mi­cro­bial Meta­bol­ism Group aims to un­der­stand, at the mo­lecu­lar level, how extremophilic microorganisms are sur­viv­ing and grow­ing in ex­treme en­vir­on­ments. How do they receive their cellular energy? How do they con­vert min­er­als into the ele­ment­ary bricks of life? And how do they pro­tect them­selves against stresses from their nat­ural en­vir­on­ment?
By cultivating the extremophiles, we can perform physiological studies, natively purify the enzymes of interest and further characterize them via biochemical analysis and structural studies.

Dr. Tristan WagnerGroup leader of the Microbial Metabolism Research Group

The Mi­cro­bial Meta­bol­ism Group aims to un­der­stand, at the mo­lecu­lar level, how extremophilic microorganisms are sur­viv­ing and grow­ing in ex­treme en­vir­on­ments. How do they receive their cellular energy? How do they con­vert min­er­als into the ele­ment­ary bricks of life? And how do they pro­tect them­selves against stresses from their nat­ural en­vir­on­ment?
By cultivating the extremophiles, we can perform physiological studies, natively purify the enzymes of interest and further characterize them via biochemical analysis and structural studies.

closepopup
Prof. Dr. Andreas BruneGroup leader of the Insect Gut Microbiology and Symbiosis Research Group

Termite guts are tiny bioreactors converting lignocellulose to microbial fermentation products that fuel the metabolism of the host. My research group studies the role of the termite gut microbiota in the symbiotic digestion of wood, focusing on the biology of the prokaryotic and eukaryotic symbionts and their interactions, the structure and functions of the intestinal ecosystem, and the evolution of its microbiota. Other aspects are the microbial processes in the guts of humivorous soil macrofauna, such as soil-feeding termites and scarab beetle larvae.

Prof. Dr. Andreas BruneGroup leader of the Insect Gut Microbiology and Symbiosis Research Group

Termite guts are tiny bioreactors converting lignocellulose to microbial fermentation products that fuel the metabolism of the host. My research group studies the role of the termite gut microbiota in the symbiotic digestion of wood, focusing on the biology of the prokaryotic and eukaryotic symbionts and their interactions, the structure and functions of the intestinal ecosystem, and the evolution of its microbiota. Other aspects are the microbial processes in the guts of humivorous soil macrofauna, such as soil-feeding termites and scarab beetle larvae.

closepopup

Contact us

Explore our past events and enjoy!

Please, refer to your current PhD reps for any questions.